Indigenous signs for countries in Scandinavia

Danish flag Norwegian flag David Bar-TzurSwedish flagFinnish flag

Scandinavia
[A], PO > signer, FO diagonally down, touches palm of [B with thumb against index finger], and DH twists upwards, keeping in contact with the palm, while opening to a [3] or a [5] so that the fingers are exposed to the viewer.4 (< some include Finland and Iceland, some only include these in the term "Nordic countries".)

Map of Europe

Flags: World flag database.
Map: Virtual Tourist.

For a quick, interesting resource for facts about this and other countries,
try Mystic Planet - The New Age directory of Planet Earth.


Explanation of glossing system used
(to understand how I describe the signs in this dictionary)

Denmark (Danmark)
[3], PO > signer, travels across chest while moving > DS. 2 For an animated gif of this sign, see ASL browser - Denmark.

Finland (Suomi)
(1) [X dot] taps chin with FT.2 For a QuickTime movie of this sign, see ASL browser - Finland. (2) [B], PO > NDS is held high and swerves in a backward "S" as seen by the signer and continues towards the right while twisting at the wrist. 1 (< shape of coastline.) (3) [X dot] taps teeth with FT.3 (Probably an older version of the first sign listed here.)

Iceland (Island)
[A dot], PO > signer, touches thumbtip to side of mouth and runs down chin, ending with PO down. For a QuickTime movie of this sign, see Laat het gebaren zien: Ijsland.

Norway (Norge)
(1) [1], PO away from signer, moves in diagonal from NDS up to face, descends slightly, then continues diagonal upward.2 (2) [N], PO away, moves in diagonal from NDS up to face, descends slightly, then continues diagonal upward.2 (< side of mountain and shape of the letter "N".) For an animated gif of this sign, see ASL browser - Norway.

Sweden (Sverige)
(1) [5^] touchs NDH [B], PO down, then ascends while closing to [O^] 2x.2 For an animated gif of this sign, see ASL browser - Sweden. (2) [5^], PO down, touches forearm close to elbow, then ascends while closing to [O^] 2x.1 (< mountain.)


List of sources cited

1. Sandager, O. K. (1986). Sign languages around the world North Hollywood, California: OK Publ.
2. Signs around the world: Countries [Videotape]. Burtonsville, MD: Sign Media.
3. From a handout I was given that included indigenous signs I have seen in other reference works, so it seems properly researched.
4. Go to Tegnviser, and click on "Klikk her for starte TegnViserFlash", or if that fails, "klikk her", and then scroll to "skandinavisk" and click again.

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